Test Levels! Really?!

Next in the series of software terminology lists is “Test Levels”. But there is something strange with test levels. Up until now almost every tester that I have worked with is familiar of the concept of software test levels. But I wonder if they are. What some call a test level, say Unit Testing, I would call a test type. However with a level like Component Testing I am not so sure. It seems only one level up from Unit Testing but now I am inclined to see it more as a test level. In my experience I am not alone in this confusion.

Sogeti’s brand TMap was one of the main contributors in establishing the concept of test levels (or at least so in the Netherlands). But since last year Sogeti acknowledges the confusion in their article “Test Levels? Test Types? Test Varieties!” and propose to rename it Test Varieties. Even ISTQB or ISO do not mention test levels (or test phases) if you like explicitly.

But test levels are a term with some historic relevance and as such they are part of my series of software testing lists. Even if nowadays I never use them anymore.

Acceptance Testing

  • Formal testing with respect to user needs, requirements, and business processes conducted to determine whether or not a system satisfies the acceptance criteria and to enable the user, customers or other authorized entity to determine whether or not to accept the system. (ISTQB – Standard Glossary of Terms Used in Software Testing Version 3.01)
  • A formal test conducted to determine whether or not a system satisfies its acceptance criteria and to enable the customer to determine whether or not to accept the system. (Cunningham & Cunningham, Inc.; http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?AcceptanceTest)
  • Acceptance testing is the process of comparing the program to its initial requirements and the current needs of its end users. (G. Meyers, The art of software testing (2nd edition) [2004])

Chain Test

  • A chain test tests the interaction of the system with the interfacing systems. (Derk-Jan de Grood; Test Goal, 2008)

Claims Testing

  • The product should behave the way some document, artifact, or person says it should. The claim might be made in a specification, a Help file, an advertisement, an email message, or a hallway conversation, and the person or agency making the claim has to carry some degree of authority to make the claim stick. (Michael Bolton; Testing without a map, 2005)
  • The object of a claim test is to evaluate whether a product lives up to its advertising claims. (Derk-Jan de Grood; Test Goal, 2008)

Component Testing

  • The testing of individual software components. (ISTQB – Standard Glossary of Terms Used in Software Testing Version 3.01

Function Testing

  • Function testing is a process of attempting to find discrepancies between the program and the external specification. An external specification is a precise description of the program’s behavior from the point of view of the end user. (G. Meyers, The art of software testing (2nd edition) [2004])

Functional Acceptance Test

  • The functional acceptance test is carried out by the accepter to demonstrate that the delivered system meets the required functionality. The functional acceptance test tests the functionality against the system requirements and the functional design. (Derk-Jan de Grood; Test Goal, 2008)
  • The functional acceptance test is a test carried out by the future user(s) in an optimally simulated production environment, with the aim of demonstrating that the developed system meets the functional requirements. (TMap NEXT; Michiel Vroon, Tim Koomen, Leo van der Aalst, Bart Broekman, 2006)

Hardware-software Integration Testing

  • Testing performed to expose defects in the interfaces and interaction between hardware and software components. (ISTQB – Standard Glossary of Terms Used in Software Testing Version 3.01)

Integration Testing

  • Testing performed to expose defects in the interfaces and in the interactions between integrated components or systems. (ISTQB – Standard Glossary of Terms Used in Software Testing Version 3.01)

Module Test

  • Module tests focus on the elementary building blocks in the code. They demonstrate that the modules meet the technical design. (Derk-Jan de Grood; Test Goal, 2008)
  • Module testing (or unit testing) is a process of testing the individual subprograms, subroutines, or procedures in a program. Module testing (or unit testing) is a process of testing the individual subprograms, subroutines, or procedures in a program. (G. Meyers, The art of software testing (2nd edition) [2004])

Module Integration Test

  • Module integration tests focus on the integration of two or more modules. (Derk-Jan de Grood; Test Goal, 2008)

Pilot

  • The pilot simulates live operations in a safe environment so that the live environment is not disrupted if the pilot fails.

Production Acceptance Test

  • The system owner uses the PAT to determine that the system is ready to go live and can go into maintenance. (Derk-Jan de Grood; Test Goal, 2008)
  • The production acceptance test is a test carried out by the future administrator(s) in an optimally simulated production environment, with the aim of demonstrating that the developed system meets the requirements set by system management. (TMap NEXT; Michiel Vroon, Tim Koomen, Leo van der Aalst, Bart Broekman, 2006)

System Test / System Testing

  • Testing an integrated system to verify that it meets specified requirements. (ISTQB – Standard Glossary of Terms Used in Software Testing Version 3.01)
  • The system test demonstrates that the system works according to the functional design. (Derk-Jan de Grood; Test Goal, 2008)
  • System testing is not limited to systems. If the product is a program, system testing is the process of attempting to demonstrate how the program, as a whole, does not meet its objectives. (G. Meyers, The art of software testing (2nd edition) [2004])
  • System testing, by definition, is impossible if there is no set of written, measurable objectives for the product. (G. Meyers, The art of software testing (2nd edition) [2004])
  • A system test is a test carried out by the supplier in a (manageable) laboratory environment, with the aim of demonstrating that the developed system, or parts of it, meet with the functional and non-functional specifications and the technical design. (TMap NEXT; Michiel Vroon, Tim Koomen, Leo van der Aalst, Bart Broekman, 2006)

System Integration Test

  • A system integration test is a test carried out by the future user(s) in an optimally simulated production environment, with the aim of demonstrating that (sub)system interface agreements have been met, correctly interpreted and correctly implemented. (TMap NEXT; Michiel Vroon, Tim Koomen, Leo van der Aalst, Bart Broekman, 2006) 

Unit Test

  • A unit test is a test carried out in the development environment by the developer, with the aim of demonstrating that a unit meets the requirements defined in the technical specifications (TMap NEXT; Michiel Vroon, Tim Koomen, Leo van der Aalst, Bart Broekman, 2006)

Unit Integration Test

  • A unit integration test is a test carried out by the developer in the development environment, with the aim of demonstrating that a logical group of units meets the requirements defined in the technical specifications (TMap NEXT; Michiel Vroon, Tim Koomen, Leo van der Aalst, Bart Broekman, 2006)

User Acceptance Test

  • The user acceptance test is primarily a validation test to ensure the system is “fit for purpose”. The test checks whether the users can use the system, how usable the system is and how the system integrates with the workflow and processes. (Derk-Jan de Grood; Test Goal, 2008)
  • The user acceptance test is a test carried out by the future user(s) in an optimally simulated production environment, with the aim of demonstrating that the developed system meets the requirements of the users. (TMap NEXT; Michiel Vroon, Tim Koomen, Leo van der Aalst, Bart Broekman, 2006)

4 thoughts on “Test Levels! Really?!

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